Girls Just Want To Have Fun - Until They Don't.

Girls have a reputation for being more difficult to raise than boys--past a certain age. It's not entirely their fault, though. Part of it has to do with puberty and the hormones involved, and part of it has to do with society. The "cool" kid at school is almost always the one who's the least likely to succeed after school. You know who. He's the guy with the leather jacket who smokes on the playground, or the girl whose body developed earlier than her social circle, and so gets the attention of the boys more quickly.

Both of these "cool" school types are likely to come from homes of neglect, where that kind of behavior goes unremarked. This can cause children who aren't neglected to desire what they see as "freedom" or "independence", but what is in reality a coping mechanism designed to shield the "cool" kid from inner pain. But your teenage girl doesn't have the experience or sophistication to understand the larger picture.

All she sees is Susie getting all the attention of the football team. So she starts to dress like Susie, and smoke like Johnny, and drink, or do drugs--not out of neglect, out of the common social drive that pushes people from adolescence to adulthood.

Only, when such behaviors are adopted so young, they can have drastic consequences. And with society pushing sexuality on teenagers harder than ever, those consequences can permanently change the course of your teen's life.

A Change In The Winds

Troubled girls may not always appear troubled. Troubled girls like to think of themselves as "independent" or "desirable" or "popular". Sometimes the best way to help troubled girls is through a program removing them from a situation impossible to control from the parents' end. You can't control the upbringing of your daughter's peers.

Bordering Canada is Troy, Montana. In Troy is a place called Turning Winds RTC. Turning Winds is a Residential Treatment Center functioning as a kind of therapeutic boarding school amidst a plethora of outdoor activities and good, clean, healthy fun. With a 5-1 student-to-teacher ratio and a reputation for facilitating academic excellence in teens, this organization treats everything from autism spectrum disorders to substance abuse and ADHD.

If you want to help your troubled daughter transition into healthy adulthood, and nothing seems to work, you might consider Turning Winds. Call us for more information at: 800-845-1380


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